Last edited by Zulkim
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

3 edition of commentary on Plato"s Protagoras found in the catalog.

commentary on Plato"s Protagoras

Goldberg, Larry.

commentary on Plato"s Protagoras

by Goldberg, Larry.

  • 250 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by P. Lang in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plato.,
  • Protagoras.,
  • Socrates.,
  • Ethics -- Early works to 1800.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 348-352.

    StatementLarry Goldberg.
    SeriesAmerican university studies., v. 1
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB382 .G65 1983
    The Physical Object
    Pagination352 p. ;
    Number of Pages352
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3187232M
    ISBN 10082040022X
    LC Control Number83048410

    His book is titled Truth not "Truth for me." Protagoras is making a philosophical statement about the structure of reality. If it is true, then it is true for all of us, pigs and baboons included. Herein lies the problem. If Protagoras' claim is correct, then what could it mean for such a claim to be true? Socrates and Protagoras on Political Rhetoric and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education, Vol. 36, Issue. 3, p. A Commentary on Plato's Protagoras. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages.

    "Clarendon Plato Series: Protagoras (Revised Edition)" published on by Oxford University Press. Delve into Plato’s massive model of the ideal state with a variety of resources for a rich study of the Republic. Begin with Jowett and Campbell’s classic Greek text, notes, and essays, and explore Vaughan and Davies’ scholarly English translation. G.H. Wells then summarizes Plato’s argument in each book of the Republic, and Bernard Bosanquet provides a commentary and notes for English.

    Source: Jowett's Introduction to and Analysis of The Republic in vol. 3 of The Dialogues of Plato translated into English with Analyses and Introductions by B. Jowett, M.A. in Five Volumes. 3rd edition revised and corrected (Oxford University Press, ). This is only the first part of a lengthy, page Introduction Jowett wrote. Go here to see the full Introduction and Analysis. Plato: Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato (a textbook edition of Euthyphro, Meno, and the first book of the Republic), ed. by John Holbo and Belle Waring (Javascript-dependent Flash at ) Plato: The Republic (based on the edition; includes translator's full commentary), trans. by Benjamin Jowett (Gutenberg text).


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Commentary on Plato"s Protagoras by Goldberg, Larry. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Early works Early works to Ouvrages avant Additional Physical Format: Online version: Goldberg, Larry. Commentary on Plato's Protagoras.

A commentary on Plato's Protagoras (American university studies) Unknown Binding – January 1, by Larry Goldberg (Author) › Visit Amazon's Larry Goldberg Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Author: Larry Goldberg. Get this from a library. Plato's Protagoras: translation, commentary, and appendices.

[Plato.; James A Arieti; Roger Milton Barrus] -- "Protagoras is one of Plato's most delightfully comic and playful dialogues, and is also one of his most important. This new edition of Plato's Protagoras provides a. User Review - Flag as inappropriate Mr Taylor's translation and commentary on the Protagoras remains indispensable for seriously studying this dialogue.

In my as yet unpublished paper on the Protagoras, the views of Taylor are contested on some points and cited with agreement with others. I take the liberty of inviting you to read my paper with its references to Taylor's commentary and Reviews: 1.

Protagoras is one of Plato's most delightfully comic and playful dialogues, and is also one of his most important. This new edition of Plato's Protagoras provides a rigorously clear and accurate translation that communicates Plato's puns, metaphors, figures of speech, and other verbal techniques naturally; allowing scholars to feel the full scope of Plato's rhetoric.

Background Information. The Protagoras really has two authors: Socrates, the main speaker, and Plato, his pupil. Plato never appears in the dialogue, but his shaping hand is always present.

Socrates engages in dialogues with other characters—with Protagoras, with Prodicus, and so on—but these dialogues bear traces of another dialogue taking place in this text: that between Plato and his.

The Protagoras is a strangely disjointed text. On a first reading, the different sections of the dialogue may seem to have little to do with each other.

In fact, connections do exist between these apparently disparate parts, although they tend not to be on the level of. Protagoras spent most of his life at Athens, where he considerably influenced contemporary thought on moral and political questions. Plato named one of his dialogues after him.

Protagoras taught as a Sophist for more than 40 years, claiming to teach men “virtue” in the conduct of their daily lives. He is best known for his dictum “Man is the measure of all things,” probably an. Buy Protagoras by Plato (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: [a] Friend Where have you been now, Socrates. Ah, but of course you have been in chase of Alcibiades and his youthful beauty. Well, only the other day, as I looked at him, I thought him still handsome as a man—for a man he is, Socrates, between you and me, and with quite a growth of beard.

Protagoras * In Plato’s dialogue “Protagoras” Socrates tells a companion his experience and interview with a man he deems fairer than Alcibiades. His name is then revealed to be Protagoras. * Protagoras is described as a wise man because if one makes friends with him and gives him money, he would make the benefactor as wise as he is himself.

Protagoras by Plato, part of the Internet Classics Archive. Commentary: Several comments have been posted about Protagoras. Download: A k text-only version is available for download.

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another.

Protagoras (/ p r oʊ ˈ t æ ɡ ə r ə s /; Greek: Πρωταγόρας) is a dialogue by traditional subtitle (which may or may not be Plato's) is "or the Sophists".

The main argument is between Socrates and the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated sophist and philosopher. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns.

The opposition of (Greek) and (Greek) seems also intended to express the rival doctrines of Socrates and Protagoras, and is a facetious commentary on their differences. (4) The general treatment in Plato both of the Poets and the Sophists, who are their interpreters, and whom he delights to identify with them.

Commentary. Leo Strauss on Plato’s Republic - Strauss, Leo. - Benardete, Seth, "Protagoras's Myth and Logos," Book description (from the publisher): This is the first full-length study of the Symposium to be published in English [originally published in ], and one of the first English works on Plato to take its bearings by the.

PLATO: Protagoras - FULL AudioBook | Greatest Audio Books Philosophy & Philosophers - Protagoras (Greek: Πρωταγόρας, ca. BC -- BC) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher and is. Summary Protagoras. In Plato’s dialogue “Protagoras” Socrates tells a companion his experience and interview with a man he deems fairer than Alcibiades.

His name is then revealed to be Protagoras. Protagoras is described as a wise man because if one makes friends with him and gives him money, he would make the benefactor as wise as he is.

The Protagoras is a must read for understanding Plato’s great esteem for Socrates as well as being a cornerstone of the Platonic ideological project.

read Plato pretty much at sight, but even then, the notes are nugatory and rarely enlightening. We need a decent modern commentary. Read more. Helpful. Sending feedback Thank you for your Reviews:.

Plato’s Statesman, this is a book I know very little about. Why did you choose it? This was the subject of my PhD thesis and my first book. It’s a very neglected dialogue of Plato’s, and wrongly so, I think. Often people say Plato has three great political dialogues, the Republic, the Statesman and the Laws.

One problem with saying that.Protagoras, with the commentary of Hermann Sauppe Item Preview remove-circle Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

"List of abbreviations used in the College series of Greek authors," 2 p., inserted after t.-p.Protagoras, along with three middle period ( b.c.e.) dialogues, Politeia (Republic, ), Phaedn (Phaedo, ), and Symposion (Symposium, ), represents the high point of Plato’s.